Phototherapy And Photo Protection

If you are worried that your skin is never going to look the same after the development of some skin disease or the other, then worry no more. Maybe you have tried all the possible topical treatments and applications and you have even tried taking oral medication for your problems, but it just doesn’t seem like it’s going to get better. Well maybe the perfect solution to all your problems is here finally. Rad on to find out what it is. We just may have the ideal solution for unwanted hair with our best IPL machine.

And this is how it works by using phototherapy. Phototherapy UVB and UVA have localized immunosuppressive effects in the skin and there is increasing evidence that they can also suppress systemic immunoreactivity: hence their use in the treatment of several inflammatory dermatoses. But that being said we also know that too much of anything is not good for our health and same goes for this type of treatment. It’s not advised that you get too much of exposure to these machines.

Because with prolonged exposure, they also cause skin ageing and predispose to skin malignancy especially in fair-skinned individuals, just like in the case of tattoo removal machines. UVB is less carcinogenic than UVA and is the preferred treatment for most dermatoses. Sunbeds are used for tanning and predominantly deliver UVA; they are of limited effectiveness in treating skin disease. If used frequently, there is an increased risk of skin cancer and premature ageing. The following types of phototherapy are used therapeutically, broad-band UVB, narrow-band UVB (311 nm or TL01), psoralen and UVA (PUVA), high-intensity long wave UVA (UVA-1).

Narrow-band UVB therapy is widely employed in the treatment of eczema and psoriasis, and is usually given three times a week for 6–10 weeks. It has superseded broad-band UVB, as it is more effective. UVA is relatively ineffective alone, and so is used with a psoralen photosensitizer, which may be applied topically or taken orally (PUVA therapy). PUVA is usually given twice a week, and if the psoralen is taken orally, UV-protective glasses must be worn for the day of treatment to protect the retina. The use of PUVA is limited because long-term treatment increases the risk of skin cancer development, especially squamous cell carcinoma. The maximum recommended lifetime dose is 1000 joules (approximately 200 treatments).

Unaffected regions of skin or high-risk areas like the scrotum can be screened during phototherapy. High-intensity UVA-1 penetrates more deeply into the dermis and can be of benefit in autoimmune rheumatic diseases such as morphea, but it is not widely available. Sunscreens protect against UVA and UVB irradiation but they are no substitute for covering the skin and restricting exposure, especially in young children. They work by absorbing/filtering UV radiation (e.g. benzophenones, cinnamates, salicylates) or reflecting it (zinc/titanium dioxide). New sunscreen chemicals have been developed to give better protection, and the particle size of reflective sunscreens can be reduced (micronized) to improve their cosmetic acceptability. Modern creams are formulated to give broad-spectrum protection against UVA and UVB. The sun protection factor (SPF) is a measure of UVB protection and the degree to which exposure can be prolonged before burning. However, in many cases, sunscreens are not applied in adequate amounts so do not provide the SPF as labelled.